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HBI in the News: The Role of Art and Science in Parkinson's Disease

Submitted by kristy.cross on Wed, 10/02/2013 - 12:26.

HBI in the News: The Role of Art and Science in Parkinson's Disease

This week in Montreal, the third World Parkinson Congress will take place - an international forum for the latest scientific discoveries, medical practices and caregiver initiatives related to Parkinson's Disease. This Congress is like no other - it's the only place where cross-pollination of the entire spectrum of Parkinson’s disease – researchers, clinicians, people with Parkinson’s, allied health professionals and care partners -- come together.

This time, the arts and sciences will bring the Parkinson's communities together. Alongside performance arts and documentary films, you will also find researchers such as the HBI's Dr. Bin Hu, who will deliver a lecture detailing his work on treating Parkinson's patients with music.

The Nature of Stress

Submitted by kristy.cross on Wed, 08/21/2013 - 16:07.

The Nature of Stress

In today's world of constant stress, understanding the mechanisms of the body's stress response and ways to mitigate the effects of chronic stress is becoming more and more important. A recent Think About It CBC Radio One episode investigated these mechanisms and how exposure to nature - from the foods we eat, to the pets we keep and the places we go to relax - can benefit the brain.

In order to understand the power of nature however, it is important to take a closer look at the nature of stress.

Study advances consistent terminology for vascular dementia research

Submitted by kristy.cross on Wed, 07/31/2013 - 10:19.

Study advances consistent terminology for vascular dementia research

Vascular dementia is the second most prevalent dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, accounting for approximately 20 per cent of all dementia cases. The identification of the disease, which is often caused by stroke, is dependent on reliable neuroimaging such as MRI. To date, inconsistencies in terminology and definitions of lesions on the brain have hindered progress in the field of vascular dementia research, but a new multi-national study involving researchers from the University of Calgary’s Faculty of Medicine hopes to change that by introducing a new set of standards. The study was published online in the journal Lancet Neurology in July.

Online tool helps calculate future depression risk

Submitted by kristy.cross on Wed, 07/17/2013 - 10:37.

Online tool helps calculate future depression risk

In response to the prevalence of major depression in the Canadian population, researchers from the HBI at the University of Calgary have developed a way to predict those who may be at greatest risk. The findings were published in a study in the Journal of Affective Disorders in June. According to Health Canada, approximately 11 per cent of men and 16 per cent of women in Canada will experience a major depressive episode (MDE) at some point in their life.

New brain research shows two parents may be better than one

Submitted by Communications on Thu, 05/02/2013 - 10:12.

New brain research shows two parents may be better than one

A team of researchers at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) have discovered that adult brain cell production might be determined, in part, by the early parental environment. The study suggests that dual parenting may be more beneficial than single parenting. Scientists studied mouse pups that were raised by either dual or single parents and found that adult cell production in the brain might be triggered by early life experiences. The scientists also found that the increased adult brain cell production varied based on gender. 

HBI researchers shine light on how stress circuits learn at a young age

Submitted by Communications on Mon, 04/08/2013 - 14:55.

HBI researchers shine light on how stress circuits learn at a young age

Researchers at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) have discovered that stress circuits in the brain undergo profound learning early in life. Using a number of cutting edge approaches, including optogenetics, Dr. Jaideep Bains and colleagues have shown stress circuits are capable of self-tuning following a single stress. These findings demonstrate that the brain uses stress experience during early life to prepare and optimize for subsequent challenges.

Study suggests lower-back MRI scans often unnecessary

Submitted by Communications on Tue, 03/26/2013 - 12:25.

Study suggests lower-back MRI scans often unnecessary

HBI member Dr. Tom Feasby is part of a team of researchers investigating the appropriateness of lower-back and head MRIs and have concluded many requests for these scans are not needed. In a joint study led by the University of Calgary and the University of Alberta, using methodology developed at the RAND Corporation, 2,000 requisitions for magnetic resonance imaging scans placed in Edmonton and Ottawa were examined to determine if they were appropriate.

New study may provide insight into long-term changes in adult brain after early-life inflammation

Submitted by Communications on Mon, 03/25/2013 - 09:12.

New study may provide insight into long-term changes in adult brain after early-life inflammation

A study by researchers at the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI) reported early-life inflammation can lead to long-lasting molecular changes and increased excitability in the adult rat brain. Led by Aylin Reid as part of her PhD thesis, the study was conducted jointly in the labs of Dr. Quentin Pittman and Dr. Cam Teskey, Reid’s supervisors, and co-authored by Pittman, Teskey and Dr. Kiarash Riazi.

HBI researcher leads international report on concussions in sports

Submitted by Communications on Tue, 03/12/2013 - 09:40.

HBI researcher leads international report on concussions in sports

Leading sports medicine researcher and HBI member Dr. Willem Meeuwisse is the co-author of a just-published international report that offers a consensus view among scientists and doctors about the treatment of concussion. The report was co-published simultaneously in the April 2013 issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine and the Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine.

Study finds serious addictions start sooner in youth at risk of mood disorders

Submitted by Communications on Wed, 02/06/2013 - 13:02.

Study finds serious addictions start sooner in youth at risk of mood disorders

Children at risk of bipolar and related mood disorders can develop serious substance abuse as young as 14, says a new study by Dr. Anne Duffy, the holder of the Campus Alberta Innovates Program (CAIP) Professorship in Child and Youth Mental Health at The Mathison Centre for Mental Health Research & Education, Hotchkiss Brain Institute and professor of Psychiatry.